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Data from Harmon, R. (2020), Water table depth and bedrock permeability control magnitude and timing of transpiration-induced diel fluctuations in groundwater.


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Resource type: Composite Resource
Storage: The size of this resource is 14.9 MB
Created: Dec 09, 2019 at 8:31 p.m.
Last updated: Apr 03, 2020 at 9:58 p.m.
DOI: 10.4211/hs.02e2e437a6044ea39bee0b95ec83fa1e
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Sharing Status: Published
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Abstract

Data from Harmon, R., Barnard, H., and Singha, K. (2020). Water-table depth and bedrock permeability control magnitude and timing of transpiration-induced diel fluctuations in groundwater. Water Resources Research, 56, e2019WR025967. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019WR025967.

The subsurface processes that mediate the connection between evapotranspiration and groundwater within forested hillslopes are poorly defined. Here, we investigate the origin of diel signals in unsaturated soil water, groundwater, and stream stage on three forested hillslopes in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in western Oregon, USA, during the summer of 2017, and assess how the diurnal signal in evapotranspiration (ET) is transferred through the hillslope and into these stores. There was no evidence of diel fluctuations in upslope groundwater wells, suggesting that tree water uptake in upslope areas does not directly contribute to the diel signal observed in near-stream groundwater and streamflow. The water table in upslope areas resided within largely consolidated bedrock, which was overlain by highly fractured unsaturated bedrock. These subsurface characteristics inhibit formation of diel signals in groundwater and impeded the transfer of diel signals in soil moisture to groundwater because (1) the bedrock where the water table resides limited root penetration and (2) the low unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the highly fractured rock weakened the hydraulic connection between groundwater and soil/rock moisture. Transpiration-driven diel fluctuations in groundwater were limited to near-stream areas but were not ubiquitous in space and time. The depth to the groundwater table and the geologic structure at that depth likely dictated rooting depth and thus controlled where and when the transpiration-driven diel fluctuations were apparent in riparian groundwater. This study outlines the role of hillslope hydrogeology and its influence on the translation of evapotranspiration and soil moisture fluctuations to groundwater and stream fluctuations.

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Resource Level Coverage

Spatial

Coordinate System/Geographic Projection:
WGS 84 EPSG:4326
Coordinate Units:
Decimal degrees
Place/Area Name:
H.J. Andrews Watershed 10
North Latitude
44.2202°
East Longitude
-122.2544°
South Latitude
44.2168°
West Longitude
-122.2600°

Temporal

Start Date:
End Date:

Content

References

Related Resources

This resource is described by: Harmon, R., Barnard, H. R., & Singha, K. (2020). Water table depth and bedrock permeability control magnitude and timing : of transpiration-induced diel fluctuations in groundwater. Water Resources Research, 56, e2019WR025967. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019WR025967

Credits

Funding Agencies

This resource was created using funding from the following sources:
Agency Name Award Title Award Number
National Science Foundation Long-Term Ecological Research at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest DEB-1440409
National Science Foundation From Roots to Rock - Linking Evapotranspiration and Groundwater Fluxes in the Critical Zone EAR-1446161 and EAR-1446231

How to Cite

Harmon, R. E., H. R. Barnard, K. Singha (2020). Data from Harmon, R. (2020), Water table depth and bedrock permeability control magnitude and timing of transpiration-induced diel fluctuations in groundwater., HydroShare, https://doi.org/10.4211/hs.02e2e437a6044ea39bee0b95ec83fa1e

This resource is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-NoCommercial CC BY-NC.

 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
CC-BY-NC

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