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Data from Johnston et al. (2017), Electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, and geochemical data characterizing acid mine drainage in Lion Creek, Empire, Colorado, USA


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Resource type: Composite Resource
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Created: Mar 23, 2020 at 4:46 p.m.
Last updated: Mar 24, 2020 at 8:29 p.m.
DOI: 10.4211/hs.4562c846daf7489186f480ae8deea7c8
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Sharing Status: Published
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Abstract

This file includes the data published in: Johnston, A.J., Runkel, R.L., Navarre-Sitchler, A. and Singha, K. (2017). Exploration of diffuse and discrete sources of acid mine drainage to a headwater mountain stream in Colorado, USA. Mine Water and the Environment, doi:10.1007/s10230-017-0452-6, 16 p.

We investigated the impact of acid mine drainage (AMD) contamination from the Minnesota Mine, an inactive gold and silver mine, on Lion Creek, a headwater mountain stream near Empire, Colorado. The objective was to map the sources of AMD contamination, including discrete sources visible at the surface and diffuse inputs that were not readily apparent. This was achieved using geochemical sampling, in-stream and in-seep fluid electrical conductivity (EC) logging, and electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) of the subsurface. The low pH of the AMD-impacted water correlated to high fluid EC values that served as a target for the ERI. From ERI, we identified two likely sources of diffuse contamination entering the stream: (1) the subsurface extent of two seepage faces visible on the surface, and (2) rainfall runoff washing salts deposited on the streambank and in a tailings pile on the east bank of Lion Creek. Additionally, rainfall leaching through the tailings pile is a potential diffuse source of contamination if the subsurface beneath the tailings pile is hydraulically connected with the stream. In-stream fluid EC was lowest when stream discharge was highest in early summer and then increased throughout the summer as stream discharge decreased, indicating that the concentration of dissolved solids in the stream is largely controlled by mixing of groundwater and snowmelt. Total dissolved solids (TDS) load is greatest in early summer and displays a large diel signal. Identification of diffuse sources and variability in TDS load through time should allow for more targeted remediation options.

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Resource Level Coverage

Spatial

Coordinate System/Geographic Projection:
WGS 84 EPSG:4326
Coordinate Units:
Decimal degrees
Place/Area Name:
Minnesota Mine, Empire, Colorado
North Latitude
39.7805°
East Longitude
-105.6874°
South Latitude
39.7761°
West Longitude
-105.6915°

Temporal

Start Date:
End Date:

Content

References

Related Resources

The content of this resource is part of: Johnston, A.J., Runkel, R.L., Navarre-Sitchler, A. and Singha, K. (2017). Exploration of diffuse and discrete sources of acid mine drainage to a headwater mountain stream in Colorado, USA. Mine Water and the Environment, doi:10.1007/s10230-017-0452-6, 16 p.

Credits

Contributors

People that contributed technically, materially, financially, or provided general support for the creation of the resource's content but are not considered authors.

Name Organization Address Phone Author Identifiers
Robert L. Runkel U.S. Geological Survey

How to Cite

Johnston, A., J. Randell, K. Singha (2020). Data from Johnston et al. (2017), Electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, and geochemical data characterizing acid mine drainage in Lion Creek, Empire, Colorado, USA, HydroShare, https://doi.org/10.4211/hs.4562c846daf7489186f480ae8deea7c8

This resource is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-NoCommercial CC BY-NC.

 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
CC-BY-NC

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