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LCZO -- Vegetation, Soil Gas, Soil Moisture -- Canopy Trimming Experiment -- Quebrada Prieta, El Verde -- (2003-2016)


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Abstract

General description of Experiment and Projects: Hurricanes are important drivers of periodic disturbances on tropical forests of the Luquillo Mountauns. The immediate impact of this disturbance is on the canopy biomass which is redistributed from the canopy compartments to the detrital pool of the forest floor hence creating a wide opened canopy. The Canopy Trimming Experiment (CTE) is a long-term experiment designed for two purposes: 1) to decouple the effect of canopy disturbance (e.g., increasing light levels, temperature, moisture, etc.) from those of increased detrital inputs on rates of germination, growth, survival, detritus processing, nutrient cycling, soil conditions, and trophic structure, and 2) to increase the frequency of simulated hurricane effects above background levels to once every six to ten years. Climate change models predict increased frequency and intensity of Caribbean hurricanes (Emmanuel 1987, Goldenberg et al. 2001), and the goal is to evaluate predictions regarding the effects of an increased rate of hurricane disturbance on tabonuco forest (Sanford et al. 1991). The interaction of biotic and abiotic processes, all modified by the disturbance, are key in determining ecosystem responses because they regulate critical ecosystem fluxes and storage associated with detritus decomposition. These processes define detrital dynamics and play a central role in the recovery of forest structure and function after disturbance. Therefore, a third component of this experiment was to implement a series of short-term biotic manipulations nested within the large-scale CTE design, consisting on faunal manipulations to measure the strength of interactions between autotrophic and detrital food webs in the context of hurricane-associated disturbance, which allowed to asses the important components of the foodwebs. The overall hypothesis is as follow: Short-term dynamics of key response variables after disturbance will be a function of the interaction between microclimate and detrital inputs, whereas long-term dynamics (particularly of SOM and NPP) will be a function of detrital inputs.

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Resource Level Coverage

Spatial

Coordinate System/Geographic Projection:
WGS 84 EPSG:4326
Coordinate Units:
Decimal degrees
Place/Area Name:
El Verde Field Station, Quebrada Prieta, Quebrada Prieta, El Verde
North Latitude
18.3223°
East Longitude
-65.7407°
South Latitude
18.2614°
West Longitude
-65.8569°

Temporal

Start Date:
End Date:

Content

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LCZO -- Vegetation, Soil Gas, Soil Moisture -- Canopy Trimming Experiment -- Quebrada Prieta, El Verde -- (2003-2016)


OVERVIEW

Description/Abstract

General description of Experiment and Projects: Hurricanes are important drivers of periodic disturbances on tropical forests of the Luquillo Mountauns. The immediate impact of this disturbance is on the canopy biomass which is redistributed from the canopy compartments to the detrital pool of the forest floor hence creating a wide opened canopy. The Canopy Trimming Experiment (CTE) is a long-term experiment designed for two purposes: 1) to decouple the effect of canopy disturbance (e.g., increasing light levels, temperature, moisture, etc.) from those of increased detrital inputs on rates of germination, growth, survival, detritus processing, nutrient cycling, soil conditions, and trophic structure, and 2) to increase the frequency of simulated hurricane effects above background levels to once every six to ten years. Climate change models predict increased frequency and intensity of Caribbean hurricanes (Emmanuel 1987, Goldenberg et al. 2001), and the goal is to evaluate predictions regarding the effects of an increased rate of hurricane disturbance on tabonuco forest (Sanford et al. 1991). The interaction of biotic and abiotic processes, all modified by the disturbance, are key in determining ecosystem responses because they regulate critical ecosystem fluxes and storage associated with detritus decomposition. These processes define detrital dynamics and play a central role in the recovery of forest structure and function after disturbance. Therefore, a third component of this experiment was to implement a series of short-term biotic manipulations nested within the large-scale CTE design, consisting on faunal manipulations to measure the strength of interactions between autotrophic and detrital food webs in the context of hurricane-associated disturbance, which allowed to asses the important components of the foodwebs. The overall hypothesis is as follow: Short-term dynamics of key response variables after disturbance will be a function of the interaction between microclimate and detrital inputs, whereas long-term dynamics (particularly of SOM and NPP) will be a function of detrital inputs.

Creator/Author

Cantrell, Sharon|Gonzalez, Grizelle|Lodge, D. Jean|McDowell, William H.|Richardson, Barbara A.|Sharpe, Joanne M.|Shiels, Aaron|Schowalter, Timothy D.|Silver, Whendee|Willig, Michael R.

CZOs

Luquillo

Contact

Miguel Leon, Miguel.Leon@unh.edu

Subtitle

Litter decomposition, Trace gases, lysimeter chemistry, diameter at breast height (DBH)




SUBJECTS

Disciplines

Biology / Ecology

Topics

Vegetation|Soil Gas|Soil Moisture

Subtopic

Canopy Trimming Experiment

Keywords

Canopy Trimming experiment|Litterfall|DNA|DBH|Depth Breast Height|Soil Trace gases|Litter decomposition

Variables

Litterfall|DNA|DBH|Depth Breast Height|Soil Trace gases|Litter decomposition

Variables ODM2

Diameter at breast height (DBH)|DNA damage, olive tail moment|Plant litter|Soil trace gases




TEMPORAL

Date Start

2003-03-01

Date End

2016-09-12




SPATIAL

Field Areas

El Verde Field Station|Quebrada Prieta

Location

Quebrada Prieta, El Verde

North latitude

18.32232903

South latitude

18.26143335

West longitude

-65.85692813

East longitude

-65.74067507




REFERENCE

Citation

Cantrell, Sharon; Gonzalez, Grizelle; Lodge, D. Jean; McDowell, William H.; Richardson, Barbara A.; Sharpe, Joanne M.; Shiels, Aaron; Schowalter, Timothy D.; Silver, Whendee; Willig, Michael R. Canopy Trimming Experiment (CTE) 2015.

CZO ID

5751



Additional Metadata

Name Value
czos Luquillo
czo_id 5751
citation Cantrell, Sharon; Gonzalez, Grizelle; Lodge, D. Jean; McDowell, William H.; Richardson, Barbara A.; Sharpe, Joanne M.; Shiels, Aaron; Schowalter, Timothy D.; Silver, Whendee; Willig, Michael R. Canopy Trimming Experiment (CTE) 2015.
keywords Canopy Trimming experiment, Litterfall, DNA, DBH, Depth Breast Height, Soil Trace gases, Litter decomposition
subtitle Litter decomposition, Trace gases, lysimeter chemistry, diameter at breast height (DBH)
variables Litterfall, DNA, DBH, Depth Breast Height, Soil Trace gases, Litter decomposition
disciplines Biology / Ecology

How to Cite

Cantrell, S., G. Gonzalez, D. J. Lodge, W. H. McDowell, B. A. Richardson, J. M. Sharpe, A. Shiels, T. D. Schowalter, W. Silver, M. R. Willig (2019). LCZO -- Vegetation, Soil Gas, Soil Moisture -- Canopy Trimming Experiment -- Quebrada Prieta, El Verde -- (2003-2016), HydroShare, http://www.hydroshare.org/resource/a3b8d8df6ed545c4912b95dfc23c066d

This resource is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution CC BY.

 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
CC-BY

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