Hi, I'm an error. x

Data Repository: Spring and stream water evolution in a rapidly urbanizing watershed, Austin, TX


Authors:
Owners:
Resource type: Composite Resource
Storage: The size of this resource is 273.0 KB
Created: Feb 25, 2020 at 1:18 a.m.
Last updated: Feb 25, 2020 at 1:47 a.m.
DOI: 10.4211/hs.fee4cead438c458da36b91abe4130e61
Citation: See how to cite this resource
Sharing Status: Published
Views: 106
Downloads: 7
+1 Votes: Be the first one to  +1 this.  (You need to be logged in to rate this.)
Comments: No comments (yet)

Abstract

Quantifying urban development impacts on fresh water quality and quantity is critical, especially as growing populations concentrate in urban centers and with climate change projections of increased hydrologic extremes. We investigate geochemical processes through which municipal supply and waste water, carbonate bedrock, and soils impact stream and spring water compositions within the Bull Creek watershed (Austin, Texas). This watershed exhibits a sharp geographic divide between urban and rural land. Urban and rural waters were assessed to quantify relative influences of municipal water on stream and spring water elemental compositions and 87Sr/86Sr values. Higher 87Sr/86Sr for samples from urban sites relative to rural sites can be accounted for by two processes: (1) water leakage from municipal infrastructure and/or irrigation, or (2) ion exchange as precipitation infiltrates through soils with varying 87Sr/86Sr. Irrigated soils have higher 87Sr/86Sr than unirrigated soils, indicating that irrigated municipal water resets soil compositions, and that process (1) is a dominant driver of urban stream and spring water evolution. Geochemical modeling results indicate that urban waters consist of 50% to 95% municipal water. Geochemical modeling further demonstrates the evolution of municipal water as it infiltrates as groundwater and undergoes water-rock interaction. These results are compared with groundwater compositions on a regional scale to infer local flow paths and relative groundwater residences times of municipal water. This study provides a geochemical modeling framework that quantifies both the significance of municipal water on urban stream water and soil compositions, and the role of municipal water within urbanized watersheds and aquifers.

Subject Keywords

  • No subject keywords have been added.
  • ${ k }

Duplicate. Keyword not added.

Error: ${ error }
Deleting all keywords will set the resource sharing status to private.

Resource Level Coverage

Spatial

Coordinate System/Geographic Projection:
WGS 84 EPSG:4326
Coordinate Units:
Decimal degrees
Place/Area Name:
Austin, Texas
Longitude
-97.7443°
Latitude
30.2668°

Content

Additional Metadata

Name Value
Description of Supplemental Data Files The data herein is presented in the peer-review publication: Beal, L., Senison, J., Banner, J., Musgrove, M., Yazbek, L., Bendik, N., Herrington, C. and Reyes, D. 2020. Stream and spring water evolution in a rapidly urbanizing watershed, Austin, TX. Water Resources Research, in press

References

Sources

Derived From: Beal, L., Senison, J., Banner, J., Musgrove, M., Yazbek, L., Bendik, N., Herrington, C. and Reyes, D. 2020. Stream and spring water evolution in a rapidly urbanizing watershed, Austin, TX. Water Resources Research, in press

How to Cite

Beal, L. (2020). Data Repository: Spring and stream water evolution in a rapidly urbanizing watershed, Austin, TX, HydroShare, https://doi.org/10.4211/hs.fee4cead438c458da36b91abe4130e61

This resource is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution CC BY.

 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
CC-BY

Comments

There are currently no comments

New Comment

required